Home

 

August 12, 2017

An Athlete’s relationship with an Exercise Environment via Afferentation & Energy

It’s all just sensory. More information is efficient performance. Sensory is sports performance…This article was written after working with an athlete that I did NOT understand from a movement and impingement perspective. I am thankful for not understanding and for the ability to ATTEMPT to understand. Attempting to understand lead me into ideas, concepts, and thoughts that I am grateful for. Thank you to that athlete that made me better.

Click here to read full article at Rebel Performance

JULY 27, 2017

Allostatic Overload: Stress and Emotional Context Part 2

Your body adapts to different demands in different ways. The choices you make in training can dictate those adaptations of allostatic overload. What could this physically look like?

Click here to read full article at Rebel Performance

JULY 26, 2017

It’s NOT about the Grind, It’s about BUILDING. 

Create dialogue and communication with other individuals in the field. Create discussions with other interns. Hear other opinions and perspectives. Exchange ideas, thoughts, and programs. You may not agree. You may not want to speak to others, but hearing a different perspective helps you grow. Be able to talk about ‘the WHY’ and ‘the HOW’: I emphasize this because your ability to understand concepts in more important than knowing facts. Try to explain concepts, not regurgitate facts or other people’s opinions. Think for yourself, but don’t be by yourself (isolated). If you can explain something to another person in different ways, then you can truly understand something.

Click here to read full article at Dark Side Strength. 

JULY 23, 2017

Allostatic Overload: Stress and Emotional Context Part 1

Okay, I get it… ‘Allostasis’ has become the new catch phrase. However, I think it places an emphasis and understanding on the consequences of training adaptations. No, not every adaptation we make to training is positive for health and well-being; training can be associated with a cost. Consequence can have both a positive and negative result, but cost is associated with a price to pay… 

Click here to read full article at Rebel Performance.